November 2019 Reading Pile

Books & Mags

This month I have so many good things to curl under a blanket with! πŸ™‚ Among them are the following:

Reading Pile November 2019

From top to bottom: Chilling Effect by Valerie Valdes, The Future of Another Timeline by Annalee Newitz and Storm of Locusts by Rebecca Roanhorse. In addition, I took two non-fiction books out of the library: Grow in the Dark: How to Choose and Care for Low-Light Houseplants by Lisa Eldred Stenkopf and Burnout: The Secret to Unlocking the Stress Cycle by Emily Nagoski & Amelia Nagoski.

I’ve already read Newitz’s excellent novel – which pairs really well with the movie Harriet, by the way – and am in the middle of Chilling Effect.

Anything else you’d recommend? Please share!

Online Finds: Colorful Calendar for 2020

Arts & Crafts, Bits in Spaaace!, Colors

It’s time to update my planning calendar for 2020. In fact, I’m running a little late on this, and my collection of notepapers with scribbles is getting out of hand… Thankfully, Julia Groves has updated her lovely watercolor designs.

Printable Calendar for 2020 by Julia Groves

I just should’ve remembered to click the ink-saving option off when printing. Ohwell. πŸ™‚

Thank you for sharing, Julia!

Note: I wasn’t paid or perked to mention this; just passing along a good thing.

Small Bouquet from October Flowers

After Hours, My Spaces, Random Beauty

I’m both amazed and delighted over how long wild flowers blossom around here:

October Wild Flowers

Granted, they’re not terribly flashy like cultivated ones, but they do give bees and other pollinators sustenance long into the fall season and provide splashes of color, too. (We keep our yard purposely toxin-free for the bees.)

October 2019 Reading Pile

Books & Mags

My TBR pile this October looks quite fabulous!

Reading Pile October 2019

Top to bottom:

Gaslight Dogs by Karin Lowachee, To Be Taught, If Fortunate by Becky Chambers, and An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States for Young People by Roxane Dunbar-Ortiz, adapted by Jean Mendoza and Debbie Reese. Furthermore there is Mary Robinette Kowal’s The Fated Sky and Alix E. Harrow’s The Ten Thousand Doors of January.

Chambers’s is the only one haven’t yet read; I’m currently in the middle of Harrow. In addition, I’ve read a few books that didn’t make it to the photo before their due date came round. Ohwell. πŸ™‚

How’s your reading lately?

 

September 2019 Reading Pile & Other New Books

Books & Mags

This month has been so epic on my book front! I got quite a haul from the library – I even had to put two books back on the shelf because of all of the ILLs that had arrived!

Library Pile September 2019

Top to bottom they are: Millenneagram: The Enneagram Guide for Discovering Your Truest, Baddest Self by Hannah Paasch, Storm of Locusts by Rebecca Roanhorse, and Ursula Le Guin’s The Books of Earthsea: The Complete Illustrated Edition (illustrated by Charles Vess). I also grabbed Fed Up: Emotional Labor, Women, and the Way Forward by Gemma Hartley, and Flossie Teacake’s Guide to English Paper Piecing by Florence Knapp.

I also bought some books. Here are a few:

New Book Order Is in

From left to right: To Be Taught, If Fortunate by Becky Chambers, Storm of Locusts by Rebecca Roanhorse, and Kathleen Herbert’s Peace-Weavers & Shield-Maidens: Women in Early English Society.

Yes indeed, I had already nabbed Storm of Locusts from the library because my order was delayed, only to have the order arrive to my door within two days. Well, such is life. πŸ™‚

I’m looking forward to diving into these, especially To Be Taught, If Fortunate. As soon as I heard Chambers had another Wayfarers universe book coming out I knew I had to get it. I adore her writing for its humanity. Before the publication date I saw Lee Mandelo’s review at Tor.com, which didn’t exactly help – among others Mandelo says the novella is a β€œreminder of our responsibilities to one another as a social group, not as lone individuals on solitary islands. None of us exist without each other, or survive without each other.” Right up my alley!

Can’t wait! πŸ™‚

August 2019 Reading Pile

Books & Mags

Since I didn’t post this last month, here’s my August reading pile:

Reading Pile August 2019

From top to bottom: Norma by Sofi Oksanen, Hath No Fury edited by Melanie R. Meadors, and Susan Cooper’s young adult series The Dark Is Rising in a one-cover edition (Over Sea, Under Stone; The Dark Is Rising; Greenwitch; The Grey King; Silver on the Tree). Lastly, there is Silvia Moreno-Garcia’s excellent Gods of Jade and Shadow.

What’s on your TBR stack at the moment?

Happy Easter Earth Day!

After Hours, Bits in Spaaace!

Today happens to be both Easter and Earth Day. Happy Easter Earth Day, then!

Flickr NASA Goddard Black Marble Africa Europe Middle East

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center on Flickr (CC BY 2.0).

If the above’s the Earth part, here’s the Easter part. πŸ™‚

Flickr Benson Kua Late for Easter

Benson Kua on Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0).

I love both images, as different as they are.

Hope your week has started enjoyably!

April 2019 Reading Pile

Books & Mags

My March reading piles stretched well into April, so my current pile isn’t that large:

Library Pile Apr 2019

The quality will make up for the quantity, though, or so I suspect: I have Kameron Hurley’s military time-traveling scifi novel The Light Brigade, Arkady Martine’s debut novel A Memory Called Empire, and The Perfect Assassin by K.A. Doore.

Can’t wait! πŸ™‚

Anything intriguing in your pile? Do share!

March 2019 Reading Piles

Books & Mags

I got quite an awesome haul from the library:

Library Pile March 2019

In fiction I found The Afterwards by EK Johnston, The Song of All by Tina LeCount Myers, Wonder Woman: Warbringer by Leigh Bardugo and Ann Leckie’s The Raven Tower. On the non-fiction side, there’s Jane Austen’s Transatlantic Sister by Sheila Johnson Kindred.

I’m apparently really hungry for reading, for that’s not my only pile this month:

Reading Pile March 2019

From top to bottom: Little Men by Louisa May Alcott, Mem by Bethany C. Morrow, Home Fires by Julie Summers and the non-fiction title Silence: A Social History of One of the Least Understood Elements of Our Lives by Jane Brox. Finally, there’s the not-quite-brand-new-anymore Terminal Uprising by Jim C. Hines.

In addition, I’m slogging my way through all of Agatha Christie’s Hercules Poirot books, slowly but surely. The latest I’ve gotten to is Mrs. McGinty’s Dead – a fascinating case hinging (in part) by the first name Evelyn, which can apparently be both male or female. I love the fact that despite a Master’s degree and 20+ years of daily use I still learn new things about English!

Anything special you’d recommend?