Native American Style Mainstream Genre Icons

Arts & Crafts, Colors, Design & Designers, Geek out!, Stunt Double

Jeffrey Veregge, an artist and member of the Port Gamble S’Klallam Tribe in Washington state, makes positively fantastic versions of mainstream genre icons like superheroes, movie characters, Transformers, aliens, and the like.

Jeffrey Veregge Early Bird

Early Bird by Jeffrey Veregge.

Veregge himself says of his work:

“This site, the work that is seen on it is a reflection of a lifetime love affair with comic books, toys, TV and film. Taking my passions and blending them with my Native perspective, artistic background and the desire to simply be me. Basically I am just trying to have fun and get back to that kid that went to art school to begin with, wanting to create artwork that I want to see and make just for the hell of it.”

Jeffrey Veregge Shield Logo

Shield by Jeffrey Veregge.

Several of his designs would make fantastic fabric prints, like this Flash-inspired one, for example:

Jeffrey Veregge Scarlet Blurr

Scarlet Blurr by Jeffrey Veregge.

If there was a fabric Flash version, I’d use it for pencil cases, zipper travel pouches, or a table cloth. Or maybe tall, tall shades with a wide border on the bottom; that would look really striking.

Visit Veregge’s home page for more!

Cross-posted from Co-Geeking.

Note: I wasn’t paid or perked to mention this; just passing along a good thing.

Embroidered Version of Van Gogh

Arts & Crafts, Fabrics & Materials

Lauren Spark was asked by her mother to create an embroidery of Van Gogh’s The Starry Night. The results are stunning!

Lauren Spark Tumblr Starry Night

Lauren Spark.

Lauren Spark Tumblr Starry Night Progress

Lauren Spark.

The direction and hues of the stitches are spot on, even on the black tree where they are difficult to see. Very impressive! I’m not surprised it took her almost 60 hours to finish. Visit her Tumblr for more pics of the process.

Found via Colossal.

Note: I wasn’t paid or perked to mention this; just passing along a good thing.

 

 

Creativity Is: Star Wars at Pooh Corner

Books & Mags, Design & Designers

Illustrator James Hance created a whole series of delightful Winnie the Pooh – Star Wars mashups. His series is called Wookie the Chew, and you can buy individual prints, a set or a book. A few of my favorite prints include Stay on Target…

James Hance stay-on-target-THUMB-500x500

James Hance.

…and Always Thinking with His Stomach:

James Hance WTC-Always_Thinking-500x500

James Hance.

Other mashups Hance has created involve the Muppets and superheroes, Muppets and Firefly, van Gogh and Batman, and E.T. and Doctor Who, for instance. He also makes beautiful portraits in several styles. Check it out!

Note: I wasn’t paid or perked to mention this; just passing along a good thing.

Discoveries: WoW Classes as Brands

Design & Designers, Games

Creative Director and artist Matt Stevenson shared his designs for World of Warcraft classes / specs imagined as real-world commercial brands. Wow! I’m seriously impressed not just by the top-notch designs, but by the imaginary products the brands have been applied to. Here are a few of the best, IMO:

Matt Stevenson WoW Brand Guardian Druid

Matt Stevenson / dcmjs on Imgur.

 

Matt Stevenson WoW Brand Subtlety Rogue

Matt Stevenson / dcmjs on Imgur.

 

Matt Stevenson WoW Brand Fury Warrior

Matt Stevenson WoW Brand Fury Warrior

 

Found via BlizzardWatch. Stevenson also designed a retro-feel set of minimalist WoW class posters (available for sale on Etsy). My favorite is the balance druid poster:

Etsy Matt Stevenson SBTRCTV Balance Druid

Matt Stevenson / SBTRCTV on Etsy.

 

Very nice work! Check out his business website at dcmjs.com.

Note: I wasn’t paid or perked to mention this; just passing along a good thing.

Discoveries: Miniature Paintings by Lorraine Loot

Arts & Crafts

Another great painting-related find: Lorraine Loots paints incredibly detailed miniatures. Her subjects include a wide variety of items, from everday objects and furry animals to book covers and celestial objects. For example, these paintings of The Hobbit and the Eta Carina Nebula are simply astounding:

Instagram Lorraine Loots The Hobbit

The Hobbit. Lorraine Loots.

Instagram Lorraine Loots Eta Carina Nebula

Eta Carina Nebula. Lorraine Loots.

And a little rabbit for the bunny fans:

Instagram Lorraine Loots Bunny

Bunny. Lorraine Loots.

What a steady hand and keen eye she must have, plus loads of talent. I’mm very impressed! See Lorraine’s website and Instagram account for more!

Note: I wasn’t paid or perked to mention this; just passing along a good thing.

Creativity Is: Soundweaving

Design & Designers, Fabrics & Materials

Soundweaving is an interdisciplinary, integrative and experimental art project by Zsanett Szirmay. She took traditional cross-stitching patterns used in Hungarian folk embroidery and transformed them into tape-like punch cards which in turn were played by a comb music player. (Follow the link to listen to samples.)

From the project Introduction:

“Soundweaving equally stimulates all senses, and calls for interaction. … It belongs to the analogue and digital realms at the same time as the handmade embroidery is translated into laser cut patterns. At the same time, the visual world is presented in audio, or rather the graphic aspect of music gets a role in developing the tunes.”

Sound-Weaving-by-Zsanett-Sziarmay_dezeen_SQ01

Zsanett Szirmay and Bálint Tárkány-Kovács. Photo by Sándor Fövényi; via Dezeen.

Zsanett Szirmay and Bálint Tárkány-Kovács. Photo by Sándor Fövényi; via Dezeen.

Szirmay was inspired by punch cards used in weaving machines to program patterns and in some musical instruments to produce music. She describes the roots of the project in an interview like this:

“I used to do folk dancing and wore traditional Hungarian embroidered clothes… Contemplating and taking it a step further, I was curious to find out what cross-stitched patterns might sound like.”

“The principles of [musical] composition are similar to textile design. Both areas use the prime form, inversion, retrograde and retrograde inversion… I played with these transformations in the creation of the punchcards with the help of musician and composer Bálint Tárkány-Kovács as co-producer.”

The punch card patterns themselves look like this:

Szirmay Punch Card Collage

Melodies 1, 2, 3 and 4 by Zsanett Szirmay and Bálint Tárkány-Kovács; collage by Eppu Jensen.

For exhibiting her project, Szirmay reproduced lace-like cross-stitch patterns on huge laser-cut sheets and surrounded the music boxes with these sheets and some original works of traditional embroidery.

Sound-Weaving-by-Zsanett-Sziarmay_dezeen_468_4

Zsanett Szirmay and Bálint Tárkány-Kovács. Photo by Sándor Fövényi; via Dezeen.

(Additional reporting from Dezeen magazine and Colossal; both have multiple images of the project.)

I find the embroidery-to-music aspect of the project fascinating. Also, as a textile history nerd with some knowledge of traditional Finnish patterns and techniques, simply looking at traditional handcrafts in a completely new light interests me.

The hanging laser-cut sheets are the most impressive aspect of the project for me, though. The combination of traditional patterns with a modern production method works seamlessly, and reproducing several individual motifs on each sheet keeps the whole interesting. Despite the huge size, there is enough transparency to let some light through. In fact, you could model room dividers after them. Love it!

Note: I wasn’t paid or perked to mention this; just passing along a good thing.

A Native Art Market in NYC & Washington, DC

Arts & Crafts, Design & Designers

Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian will run a Native Art Market this coming weekend, Saturday & Sunday, December 6 & 7, 2014, in New York City and Washington, D.C.

Smithsonian art-market-header

Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of the American Indian.

I had a look at some of the artists’ websites, and their skills just take my breath away. It’s humbling. The colors, shapes and techniques clearly speak of traditions so longstanding that they make my creative efforts seem meager and fleeting like a butterfly.

More info at the Native Art Market website.

Note: I wasn’t paid or perked to mention this; just passing along a good thing.

 

 

Discoveries: 8-bit Art by Adam Lister

Arts & Crafts, Design & Designers, Geek out!, Movies & TV

Artist Adam Lister creates geometric, pixelated versions of popular characters and paintings, geeky or mainstream. His approach has been described variously as urban, vintage and cubist. Whatever your preferred descriptor might be, Lister’s watercolors surely epitomize an inventive and inquisitive mind. Just some of his work that I like most include an 8-bit version of Van Gogh’s The Starry Night…

Adam_Lister_the_starry_night

Adam Lister.

… The Iron Man…

Adam_Lister_ironman

Adam Lister.

… and The Godfather

Adam_Lister_The_Godfather_sg

Adam Lister.

Simply brilliant! More at Adam Lister Gallery page.

Note: I wasn’t paid or perked to mention this; just passing along a good thing.

Discoveries: John Kovalic Mugs

Geek out!

Mugs with illustrator and cartoonist John Kovalic’s work are available from society6, including this very realistic Dork Tower comic:

DorkTower1249c Writers Write

Dork Tower by John Kovalic.

Hear, hear! I can attest the same applies to creatives.

I don’t know how I wasn’t aware of these before! I will definitely get a present or two.

Note: I wasn’t paid or perked to mention this; just passing along a good thing.

Creativity Is: Star Wars – Northwest Coast Art Crossover

Design & Designers, Geek out!, Movies & TV

Seattle artist Scott Erickson created prints of iconic Star Wars shapes in the style of the art of the indigenous peoples of the Pacific Northwest coast. The set is called Alliance is Rebellion, and it’s impressive… very impressive! (In your best Darth Vader voice, of course!)

Erickson Alliance is Rebellion 4Icons

Selected icons from Alliance Is Rebellion show by Scott Erickson.

I was interested in his creative thinking, and found Ericson’s artist statement:

“One night, not so long ago, I was thinking about the stories that had manifested into native art and how their telling visually was a gift of common remembrance to the community. I thought about how I have learned to culturally and artistically compartmentalize narratives and began wondering about trans-cultural narratives that unify instead of divide. I came to the conclusion that many trans-cultural narratives we see are epic film and television hero stories about the nature of good and evil. […]

“In the construction of this idea, though, the question that has arisen in me is, “Am I allowed to create these images?”

“Any artist, patron, or gallerist worth their salt, is appalled by the individual and cultural atrocities of unethical exhibitions sensationalizing “the other” and depriving originators not only of their dignity, but also their honor by omitting attribution and intellectual rights to their work and techniques. […]

Personally and plainly: How am I not just another white guy stealing from the native tribes for my own benefit? Is this imitation considered the best form of flattery? How do I give honor where honor is due […]

“For me, personally, these images are a bridge.

“A bridge….between two significant narratives that are as much from long ago and far far away, as they are from right here and right now.

“A bridge….between my upbringing and a wider global audience potentially unfamiliar with the aesthetics of Pacific Northwest coastal art and native storytelling.

“A bridge….between a divisive past of non-dignifying cultural theft to our present role in imagineering a more hopeful future. Where we simultaneously restore honor due to the cultural sources of storytelling and their art techniques, while exploring our individual and shared narratives with imagination, innovation, and creative freedom.”

(Apologies for a lengthy quote; I didn’t want to misrepresent him.) More images on Erickson’s site!

Note: I wasn’t paid or perked to mention this; just passing along a good thing.