Decor Tip: Hanging Wall Art with a Fork

Leveling Up, Thumbs Up

Guys! I found a really, excitingly, fabulously easy way to hang wall art:

How to easily hang a picture using a fork by 5-Minute Crafts / Creative Ideas on YouTube

Right? RIGHT!?! 😀

Found via Diane Henkler at In My Own Style.

Note: I wasn’t paid or perked to mention this; just passing along a good thing.

A Sleep Mask Prototype

Arts & Crafts, Leveling Up

One of the results of a recent prototype making session:

Critter Sleep Mask

A sleepy critter sleep mask. Brown felt with felt applique and embroidery; lined with a soft linen blend fabric for comfort. This is my very first attempt at this particular design, and I’m pretty pleased with the proportions and the expression.

I was trying for a bear – how did I do?

First Batch of Reflectors Is Now on Etsy

Ahem Ahem!, Arts & Crafts, Leveling Up

The first batch of reflectors is now listed in my Etsy shop.

1st Batch of Reflectors

These 2-sided personal safety reflectors are meant for pedestrians. They are designed to attach inside a coat pocket and to hang down at your side when in use. The reflectors come with a safety pin and string for hanging. Like so:

Reflectors in Use Not in Use

The concept is based on the reflectors I wore in my childhood, growing up 2 hours south of the Arctic Circle in Finland. In fact, I still use them – even though Massachusetts isn’t nearly as dark as Finland in winter, here in the south it gets dark year-round. The reflectors increase your visibility so much in low light conditions that I almost feel naked without one. Each of my jackets has its own dedicated reflector, and I keep extras around just in case. (They do occasionally break or get lost.)

Made with polyester felt and reflecting fabric in three silhouettes: heart, minimalistic feather or dragon’s head. Each of the three designs comes in two or three different colors.

Dragons Head Reflector Colors Collage
Feather Reflector Colors Collage
Heart Reflector Colors Collage

Check out Flickr and Twitter for some work-in-progress photos.

It’s exciting to get a new project out into the world! 🙂

Adding to My Textile Vocabulary

Fabrics & Materials, Leveling Up

Because I trained back home in Finland, I learned my sewing terminology in Finnish. Already before I moved to the U.S., I picked up a lot of English vocabulary from my hobby sewing. My favorites were earlier historical eras, though, which resulted in a curious melange of terms and terminology.

Nowadays whenever I make construction notes on my projects they usually end up a mix of Finnish and English terms and abbreviations, even though I try to stick with one language only.

Terminology Resources

To keep adding to my English vocabulary, I draw from both physical and online resources. I read guidebooks and keep binders where I file tearaways and printouts. I’ve also started bookmarking online resources.

Below are some sites I’ve found useful for learning the terminology for various aspects of textile work.

Do you have favorites you’d like to add?

Note: I wasn’t paid or perked to mention this; just passing along a good thing.

Random Beauty to-Be: Hyacinth Bulbs Growing

DIY, Leveling Up, Random Beauty

I got three hyacinths as a Christmas present last year. They blossomed wonderfully before fading. Now, I don’t have a green thumb at all, so I wasn’t sure whether – or if! – they would survive and re-bloom. I’ve been watering the seemingly dead bulbs throughout the year, hoping against hope that they’re alive.

Last Years Bulbs Growing

And they are! Yay! This is a major accomplishment for me. 🙂

Wool on Wool with Medieval Motif

Arts & Crafts, Leveling Up

While pawing through my fabric bins in search of wool for another project, I came across an old embroidery that I’d forgotten about. I originally had a purpose for it, but my plans changed, and so the finished embroidery sat around for years.

The pattern is from 9th century metalwork, with an animal – dog, if I’d had to guess – framed by a triangle. I got it from Eva Wilson’s book Early Medieval Designs (in the British Museum Pattern Books series). I used blue wool yarn on mustard-y orange wool blend.

This embroidery project was a textile history nerdery win for me, because it was my first attempt at a historical design without a counted pattern (such as cross-stitch) or a pattern drawn on the fabric. I did measure and mark the corners for the triangular frame but eyeballed the rest.

In the spirit of celebrating your successes, I decided to frame the embroidery to hang somewhere in the house rather than keep it hidden.

I don’t remember why I chose complementary colors for the work; I guess that’s what I had available at the time. The effect is a little jarring, though, which is why I chose a neutral, naturally light-colored wood frame. The two-layered mat has a narrow navy accent on the inside, which goes with the blue yarn very well.

Looking good. 🙂 I still need to decide where exactly I want it.

Cross-Body Bags: Prototypes and Two OOAKs

Colors, Design & Designers, Geek out!, Leveling Up

My book bag project inspired me to try sewing cross-body bags. As usual, the first step is making prototypes to try out different fabrics and proportions. It only took two tries – the photo below shows my second attempt – to find something both pleasing and functional.

It must mean I’ve gained more experience points. Lovely!

I also made two one-of-a-kinds to sell. They’re both made with lightweight cotton duck (canvas) off the bolt and have accents pieced together from various quilting cottons; inside there’s a pocket.

 

I’m quite pleased with how they turned out. Perfect for rainbow lovers, from the reading kind to the parade kind and everything inbetween. 🙂

The wide accent stripes in a rainbow of colors were inspired by how a spectrograph disperses white light into color spectra (and originally made waaay back). The burgundy red bag has 18 colors, the navy 17 in the accent stripe. As usual, there’s more photos on Flickr.